Hidden Section

Google searches

 

 

Ed Chalpin encyclopedia topics | Reference.com

...Throughout 1969, Hendrix also experienced a number of legal difficulties. First, a contractual dispute arose in relation to an unfavorable agreement Hendrix had entered into with producer Ed Chalpin long before he became successful. The USA dispute ended up with Hendrix having to record an album "of new songs" for Chalpin, from which Hendrix and Reprise records would receive no financial return from USA sales, including Hendrix' songwriting royalties, and worse Chalpin was granted 2% of profits from Hendrix' back catalog sold in USA. This was the genesis of the live album entitled 'Band of Gypsys'. Then on May 3, 1969, Hendrix was arrested at Toronto's Pearson International Airport after heroin and hashish were found in his luggage. Hendrix argued in his trial defense that the drugs were slipped into his bag by a fan without his knowledge, and he was acquitted...

...After attending to the successful defense of his drug possession charges in Toronto, Hendrix, in order to free his USA royalties that had been suspended by the USA courts, addressed his obligation to provide Ed Chalpin with an LP "of original material". Along with Billy Cox he hired another of his friends, drummer Buddy Miles (formerly with Wilson Pickett and The Electric Flag) for his Band of Gypsys project, they rehearsed for ten days at "Baggies" studio. They then performed a series of four concerts over the two nights of New Year and New Years day, which created the Band Of Gypsys LP, produced by Hendrix (under the name "Heaven Research"). This is the only official complete live LP released in his lifetime. This group also released a single Stepping Stone which was quickly withdrawn, and recorded several studio songs slated for Hendrix' future LP. Litigation involving Ed Chalpin continues until this day...

 

Jimi Hendrix - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

...Later in 1965, Hendrix joined a New York–based R&B band, Curtis Knight and the Squires, after meeting Knight in the lobby of the Hotel America, off Times Square, where both men were living at the time. He performed on and off with them for eight months. In October 1965, Hendrix recorded a single with Curtis Knight, "How Would You Feel" backed with "Welcome Home" (1966 RSVP 1120) and on October 15 he signed a three-year recording contract with entrepreneur Ed Chalpin, receiving 1% royalty. While the relationship with Chalpin was short-lived, his contract remained in force, which caused considerable problems for Hendrix later on in his career. The legal dispute has continued to the present day. (Several songs (and demos) from the 1965–1966 Curtis Knight recording sessions, deemed not worth releasing at the time, were marketed as "Jimi Hendrix" recordings after he became famous.) Aside from Curtis Knight and the Squires, Hendrix then toured for two months with Joey Dee and the Starliters...

...At the time Hendrix was playing sets in the Scene club in NYC in July 1967, he met Frank Zappa, whose Mothers of Invention were playing the adjacent Garrick Theater, and he was reportedly fascinated by Zappa's recently purchased wah-wah pedal. Hendrix immediately bought one from Manny's and starting using it right away on the sessions for both sides of his new single, and slightly later, on several jams recorded at Ed Chalpin's studio...

...In 1967, a contractual dispute arose in relation to an agreement Hendrix had entered into with producer Ed Chalpin in 1965. The resolution for the dispute included Hendrix having to record an LP of new material for Chalpin company, which would not feature the Experience band, and would not be associated with the Experience band name. In addition, Chalpin was granted 2% of profits from Hendrix's back catalog sold in US. For the agreed upon album, Hendrix chose to record Band of Gypsys, a live album...

...The Band of Gypsys LP was the only official completely live LP released in Hendrix's lifetime. The band also released a single "Stepping Stone" which failed to sell, and recorded several studio songs slated for Hendrix's future LP. In 1999, the tapes from the four Fillmore concerts were remastered and additional tracks and edits were released as Live at the Fillmore East. Litigation with Chalpin ended in 2007 after the "singularly uncredible witness" was fined nearly US$900,000 for failure to abide by contractual limitations and failure to pay Experience Hendrix L.L.C. its court ordered royalties...

 

Curtis Knight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

...Both Knight and Chalpin would later claim that they were trying to make Hendrix a "star", which has some validity as his first label credit was on the first single he recorded with Knight as "arranger", and the second single (both sides instrumentals) had him as co-composer with the producer Jerry Simon (a common financial ploy at the time to recompense the producer). They weren't doing a very good job though as that's as far as it got, before Chas Chandler stepped in. Chalpin had him sign a contract that gave Hendrix 1% of any royalties that his recordings earned. Which was actually very favourable in comparison to the percentage the individual members of the Beatles and the Who were getting at that time, apart from the fact that neither of the two records sold much. The sum of "one dollar" in the contract was merely a formalised legality common to most artist contracts at that time, misconstrued by many who appear to think Hendrix was "bought" for a dollar. Meanwhile, Chas Chandler, who when tipped off by Rolling Stone Keith Richards girlfriend, Linda Keith,(who had recognised his genius and was trying to find someone to further his career), took along his then manager (soon to be business partner/co-manager) Mike Jeffery, and "discovered" Hendrix in Greenwich Village while he was fronting his first band 'The Blue Flame'(often later referred to as 'The Blue Flames' which is influenced by Jimi's alias at that time 'Jimmy James', Junior Parker's Blue Flames and a popular band of '60's London 'Georgie Fame's Blue Flames'. This has subsequently become the legend 'Jimmy James and the Blue Flames'). It was only after Chalpin read music trade papers that he realized that Hendrix had made it successfully across the Atlantic in the "Psychedelic" and "Flower Power" period, and began to pursue legal action against Hendrix, his management and record companies, with Knight as his main witness.

During the legal battles, Chalpin released some of his Hendrix records:

Ballad of Jimi, Don’t Accuse Me, Drivin’ South, Flashing, Future Trip, Get That Feeling, Gloomy Monday, Happy Birthday, Hornet’s Nest, How Would You Feel, Hush Now, No Business, Odd Ball, Simon Says, Strange Things, Welcome Home, You Don’t Want Me...

 

 

Band of Gypsys - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

...With Cox and his drummer friend Buddy Miles, Hendrix next formed the Band of Gypsys, this time to fulfill his obligation to produce an LP of new material for Ed Chalpin, to be released on the Capitol label. Hendrix, in interviews as early as March 1969, had already mentioned a "jam" album to be titled Band of Gypsys. Hendrix also mentioned in his introduction at Woodstock that "Band of Gypsys" was an alternative name for the group performing there...

 

 

Ed and Sam Chalpin

Some guy named Mick Patrick has asked me to provide a bit of background an old LP, 'My Father The Pop Singer' by Sam Chalpin, for which I have the dubious honor of being the recording engineer. Dubious for sure, and not entirely accurate, since many of the tracks we used for this travesty were not engineered by me. But yes, I must confess, I was there, I got the credit, and I have lived to tell the tale...

...Studio 76 was owned by Ed Chalpin, a story in himself. I never learned what his background was, or how he got into the music business and came to own Studio 76. I later found out that, somehow or another, he had a valid, long-term contract of some type with Jimi Hendrix, long before Hendrix became a star. I was told, from that contract, he got big rich, but that was a couple of years later. Studio 76 was used mainly as a vehicle for Chalpin's business and - because it was real cheap and had a 10 Track - for demos by the unsuspecting that didn't know any better, not to mention those to whom budget was more important than anything else. Koppelman and Rubin were on a lower floor and once in a while Gary Klein would bring somebody up to put them on tape real quick. Church choirs, organ grinders, Dorian Burton with a $25 advance from Atlantic to make a demo - you name it, we got it...

...Enter Ed Chalpin. Every two weeks, when the trade magazines came out, he would scan the charts for the most rapidly moving bulleted records, the ones that really looked like they were going to go Top 20. He'd run to Colony and buy the singles, give them a listen and choose the ones he thought he could easily copy. Then they would go to the arranger - some nice fellow who could churn out 8 or 10 reasonable facsimiles, scored for a minimum amount of musicians AND do it overnight. The next morning we'd start two all-day sessions...

...Using a group of demo players working for a flat fee, we'd lay down the rhythm tracks for all the choices. Then three or four horns would come in and we'd do them. Then, if there were any that needed strings, they would come in. The strings and horns would usually be doubled. By the end of the day we had some pretty lousy copy tracks done on the fastest moving songs/records in the US.

The next day, here come the vocalists. Ed had a stable of people that could copy styles and would work cheap. They would get the records on the day we made the tracks and then come in on the second day ready to sing whatever they had been given. I only remember one guy, Scott English, who shortly thereafter wrote a career-maker titled 'Brandy', to be later immortalised as 'Mandy' by Barry Manilow. All of the singers were pros and decent and could knock 'em out pretty quick. They'd take their $150, sign a release, and hit the door. We'd add the background voices, such as they were, and start mixing. Maybe Chalpin would stay in the studio or maybe he'd be coming in and out, but whatever, sooner or later, by the end of the second day we had these copy records mixed down and done.

Chalpin would be on the phone all the next day playing the records and making lease deals in foreign countries. The fix-it guy would make the dupe tapes, the office girl would ship the reels and I'd go back to trying to get the 60 Hz hum out of something and the intermittent pops out of something else. Nice business, huh? Actually, pretty smart. Quality, believe me, was not an issue. How fast and how cheap he could do them were the criteria. I have a feeling he made a pretty good living at it. This was every two weeks and each master was sold many times.

Within a week of getting a red hot bullet, the records would be on the street in Venezuela, South Africa and points North and West. The people in those places never heard the original in the first place. The indie labels promoted what they got based on their chart action in the US and Chalpin gave them material and styles that had proven to be probable hits. They were junk, but as they say in the garment district, from where Ed Chalpin likely crawled, schlock sells. After a few years of this activity, he had a library of tracks for 100, 200 or 300 'hits'...

...Now, enter the star of the show, Ed's father, Sam Chalpin.

You can blame Mrs. Miller for this entire fiasco. Who and what Mrs. Miller was, is an entirely different story. Suffice it to say that she was an old lady; an aspiring singer plucked from obscurity by some smart arranger, who made an album of covers before she even realised she was recording, that somehow became a novelty hit. (Coincidentally, she once recorded my tune 'Mary In The Morning'. A woman singing about a girl? What hath God wrought?)

Not one to pass up the lowest common denominator (nor the opportunity to take advantage of anyone who would work cheap), Ed Chalpin decided that if Mrs. Miller was popular, then why not make a similar record with his father - and Ed would make sure that his father worked for nothing. Existing tracks, a studio he owned and a free singer - investment zero! That's what I call keeping the cost-of-goods-sold within the bounds of likely profitability...

...I swear on my children's lives that Ed made his father cry at least once, maybe more, during these sessions. It was terrible for me to watch, and possibly criminal to be involved in. Today, Ed would be arrested for Elder Abuse, and I would be the one who dropped the dime on him...

...So, one way or another, we managed to get three things completed and Ed had me do some quick mixes and an acetate. Then he left to go to Atlantic. Atlantic, for Pete's sake! What the hell? He's taking this stuff to the Mecca. He's taking that sh*t to Atlantic. What a joke. It was inconceivable to me that he would be allowed in the door and unbelievable that he would have the nerve to play it for them. No way under the sun would they be interested. Right? Wrong. In about two hours he was back with an album deal from Ahmet Ertegun personally. Boys and girls, this is when I knew that nothing in the world would ever again surprise me. Looking back, I can only assume that Ed had some interesting pictures of Ahmet with a camel. It still makes no sense to me and I defy anyone who hears it to tell me Ahmet Ertegun bought this record - sober. No chance...

...I quit Studio 76 to go to work for Sounds On Broadway. Along the way, being a fool, one day I bought a Rolex watch from a street hustler who conned me that it was stolen. I paid $25 for it. It looked as good as the top-plate on our console. It worked about as well too. Ed liked the looks of it and so I told him I really needed the money bad and I sold it to him for $35. A couple of months later we ran into each other on Broadway and he started whining about me selling him a fake watch. I'm not sure what my response was, but it was along the lines of, "After what you did to your father I'm glad I screwed you - take a hike"...

 

Ed Chalpin | Goldmine Magazine

...Back in 1965, while recording with soul singer Curtis Knight, Hendrix had agreed to a contract with Ed Chalpin and PPX Industries, an agreement that conflicted with an earlier one he signed with Sue Records. By 1967, Chalpin, along with the rest of the world, had noticed that the guitarist had become a hit-record making sensation. He was ready to get his own slice of the pie.
 
Chalpin sued for royalties, and in the ultimate settlement, suggested by Hendrix manager Michael Jeffery, he was to receive all proceeds from a new Hendrix record to be released on Capitol Records. The quickest and easiest way to fulfill this was to generate a live album from the Hendrix/Cox/Miles group, then move on and go back to the studio and prepare for whatever lay ahead creatively for Hendrix.
 As much as Jeffery saw this as a perfect solution to get past the Chalpin commitment, he was not, according to Buddy, happy about his client working with Cox and Miles...

About A Band Of Gypsys - Rock Prophecy

...On October 15, 1965, while "Jimmy" Hendrix was a sideman with Curtis Knight and the Squires, he signed an agreement with a New York record producer named Ed Chalpin. The agreement required Hendrix to record exclusively for Chalpin's PPX Enterprises for a period of three years. In exchange for his signature, Hendrix received one dollar in cash and the rights to one percent of the "retail selling price of all records sold for his production efforts, and minimum scale for arrangements he produces." A series of recordings was made for Chalpin and PPX before Hendrix left the Squires. Then, one year after he signed the now long-forgotten PPX agreement, Jimi Hendrix debuted his Experience in Evereux, France.

It wasn't long before the Experience's phenomenal success was noticed by Ed Chalpin, who then proceeded to market his old recordings of Hendrix with Curtis Knight. Hendrix's new record company initiated a lawsuit to halt the release of these records, but a New York court ruled that, however unfair, the 1965 agreement between Hendrix and Chalpin's PPX Enterprises was not illegal.

In June 1968 an out-of-court settlement was reached between the involved parties; Chalpin was given a two percent "override" on Hendrix's first three albums and complete rights to his fourth, with a guarantee of $200,000. In exchange for surrendering his 1965 agreement with Hendrix, Chalpin retained the right to market his recordings of Hendrix with Curtis Knight and the Squires.

Hendrix's third album, Electric Ladyland was released in October 1968 and it went straight to the top of the charts. A fourth album -- the one owed to Ed Chalpin -- was now due from Hendrix in 1969...

...Autumn 1969 brought increasing demands from Hendrix's management and record company for his fourth album, the one due Ed Chalpin. It was at this time that Billy Cox and another of Hendrix's longtime friends, drummer/vocalist Buddy Miles, teamed up for a very specific purpose. Cox recalls it this way: "Jimi had a financial problem (the owed album), so the Band of Gypsys got together to help bail him out, because he couldn't find anybody else to do it. We weren't looking for any big monetary gain or anything."...

 

 

Ed Chalpin vs Michael Jeffery Estate

...Mr. Chalpin instigated a lawsuit in the United States in 2001 asserting the same claims (in the name of the elderly former ancillary administrator of the Michael Jeffery estate in New York, now deceased). The New York court rejected that claim as a "meritless" fabrication. 

Experience Hendrix also obtained a legal injunction against Mr. Chalpin (and his company PPX Enterprises Inc.) in July 2002 that restricts Mr. Chalpin and PPX from issuing, releasing or licensing the exploitation of any Jimi Hendrix recordings, other than 33 Curtis Knight & The Squires masters largely recorded in 1965 when Hendrix was an unknown sideman before he gained international fame in 1967 fronting the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Mr. Chalpin has since defaulted on payment of a significant costs order that was awarded to Experience Hendrix in that litigation. 

Mr. Chalpin instigated a lawsuit in the United States in 2001 asserting the same claims (in the name of the elderly former ancillary administrator of the Michael Jeffery estate in New York, now deceased). The New York court rejected that claim as a "meritless" fabrication. 
Experience Hendrix also obtained a legal injunction against Mr. Chalpin (and his company PPX Enterprises Inc.) in July 2002 that restricts Mr. Chalpin and PPX from issuing, releasing or licensing the exploitation of any Jimi Hendrix recordings, other than 33 Curtis Knight & The Squires masters largely recorded in 1965 when Hendrix was an unknown sideman before he gained international fame in 1967 fronting the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Mr. Chalpin has since defaulted on payment of a significant costs order that was awarded to Experience Hendrix in that litigation...

...FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - OCTOBER 24th, 2006
RE: JIMI HENDRIX AUCTION OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL FRANK JEFFERY BY OCEAN TOMO AUCTIONS LLC    

Elvier von Lear of DragonSlayer Films LLC and Lawrence Miller of Purple Haze Records Ltd explained to Raymond Millien of Ocean Tomo why the Michael Frank Jeffery Estate does not own the rights of Jimi Hendrix, as claimed by Ed Chalpin, the Administrator of the Estate. 

Raymond Millien of Ocean Tomo said: “Assuming you are right, only a fool would buy it.” 

History Detail Ed Chalpin Administrator of the Michael Frank Jeffery Estate since 6 September 2000 when he became the administrator of the estate. 

5 March 1973 

Michael Jeffery died  

15 March 1973 

Administration of the Estate was granted to his wife Gillian Rosemary Jeffery. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the estate as worth NIL 

6 November 1974 

Administration of the Estate granted to Frank Albert Edward Jeffery. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the estate as worth 2000 (UK Pounds).

6 September 2000 

Administration of the Estate granted to Ed Chalpin. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the Estate as worth NiL.  Purple Haze Records Ltd   (Co reg. 4320394)

24 November 2000 

Harbottle & Lewis, the UK Lawyers acting for Ed Chalpin/ PPX Enterprises and the Michael Jeffery Estate wrote to another UK Law Firm Russells Solicitors on behalf of the Michael Jeffery Estate. This was after Ed Chalpin became the Administrator of the Estate that showed a gross value of NIL and wrote: ‘In the course of proceedings for issue against your client we have discovered gaps in Michael Jeffery’s chain of title that on the information at present available indicates that he did not own the copyrights in the Hendrix recordings’. ‘In particular there is no evidence of rights being assigned from YAMETA (the company which as producer, became the first owner of the copyright in many of the recordings and granted licenses to exploit many of the recordings) to Chas Chandler and Mike Jeffery.’ 

5 November 2001 

Ed Chalpin suggested setting up a UK Company called Purple Haze Records Ltd and sent a DAT tape of ‘Axis Bold As Love,’ the sleeve detail showing the name of YAMETA and a design showing the name was produced. 

9 November 2001 

On the instruction of Ed Chalpin, Purple Haze Records Ltd was set up; the reason Chalpin gave was to get Experience Hendrix LLC to sue the company in the UK in order to have them disclose documents of their so-called chain of title to Jimi Hendrix recordings that he said they could not show. 

1 March 2002 

A letter was sent to Harbottle & Lewis the UK Lawyers acting for Ed Chalpin/ PPX Enterprises Inc and the Michael Jeffery Estate of which Chalpin was the Administrator asking them to check the graphics detail on the sleeve for the Axis Bold As Love CD where it showed among other things YAMETA. 

4 March 2002 

Harbottle & Lewis the UK Lawyers wrote back and advised ‘If you are to face proceedings for breach of copyright, the last thing you would want is a statement to the effect that the copyright in the recordings belong to YAMETA, which is what the symbol suggests. I would have thought your position was that the copyright belonged to Michael Jeffery.’ Chalpin’s UK Lawyer had advised Purple Haze Records Ltd to unlawfully exchange a copyright. 

5 July 2002 

A Judgment against Ed Chalpin / PPX Enterprises Inc in the High Court in London read: ‘Ed Chalpin / PPX Enterprises Inc must not issue or release recordings on which Jimi Hendrix performed in any capacity whatsoever (other than 33 songs with Jimi Hendrix as a sideman). The proceedings initially began on the 14 May 2001. 

29 July 2002 

Ed Chalpin the Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate since the 6 September 2000 sent a fax that read: ‘I never had any rights to begin with’ and ‘I really believe the company paying $40,000 will require representation of ownership of the masters, which as you know, I don’t have and wont give’ This was in answer from a US Distributor who was interested in licensing the Rainbow Bridge Concert CD from the Michael Jeffery Estate. 

7 and 14 November 2002

After losing the above Judgment Ed Chalpin Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate issued a license to Purple Haze Records Ltd for the Axis Bold As Love album and the Rainbow Bridge Concert album.  

Please note: Ed Chalpin became the Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate on the 6 September 2000. If the Michael Jeffery Estate did own the rights Chalpin now claims, why did he lose the High Court action? All he need have done is show the court evidence the Michael Jeffery Estate did own the rights he claimed.  

20 January 2005

In the Supreme Court in New York in the case between Maxwell T Cohen the previous Administrator of the Estate of Michael Jeffery and Warner Bros where Warner Bros seeks to have the attorney’s fees and costs awarded against the Estate of Michael Jeffery and the successor ancillary Administrator Edward Chalpin. The court ordered the Michael Jeffery Estate and Ed Chalpin to pay $143,321-38, which the Judge ordered. 

Despite having gained control of the Michael Jeffery Estate from which 14 UK Charities should benefit and despite Ed Chalpin asking two of the Charities in London if they could use their Charities to influence the Judge in his lost action in London, Chalpin still has no evidence to support his claim. 

Dragonslayer Films LLC and Purple Haze Records LTD believe that Ed Chalpin/The Michael Jeffery or Frank Jeffery Estate do not own the rights they are claiming and are attempting to pass off in the Ocean Tomo auction. If they indeed owned the rights they claim Chalpin wouldn’t have lost his UK court action and would in fact have been able to grant the license requested in the United States.

Source : http://dragonslayerfilms.net/sitemap.aspx

The American Music Forum 
Ayler's MySpace : Pangaea...

..."9 November 2001

On the instruction of Ed Chalpin, Purple Haze Records Ltd was set up; the reason Chalpin gave was to get Experience Hendrix LLC to sue the company in the UK in order to have them disclose documents of their so-called chain of title to Jimi Hendrix recordings that he said they could not show. "...

 

 

 

Jimi Hendrix and The Band of Gypsys or That's What Happens ...

Jimi Hendrix wasn't stupid but he was naive. On October 15th 1965, he signed a three year exclusive recording contract with producer Ed Chalpin for PPX Inc in New York. At the time he was just a squirrel looking for a nut. A year later he would be discovered by Chas Chandler and the world would be introduced to fire breathing guitar and The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Chas was smart enough to buy up all of Jimi's outstanding contracts but Jimi neglected to tell Chas about one in particular. PPX Inc. After Jimi got a record deal with Warner Brothers, Chalpin demanded huge sums of cash for breach of contract. They went to court and it was eventually agreed upon in June of 69' that Jimi would record a live album not featuring The Experience, since nobody wanted to give PPX new studio material. This album would be given to PPX and be released by Capital records. Warner Brothers added a stipulation that the album not be called The Jimi Hendrix Experience, but something else as to disassociate the release from their name. This is how Jimi would satisfy Chalpin who was selling inferior recordings of Jimi from his pre-Experience days. The recordings were of low quality, other instruments were added, then sold as bonafide Jimi Hendrix recordings. Ironically in July of 67', Jimi showed up at Chalpin's studio oblivious to the legal maneuverings taking place. He just wanted to hang out with friends and show off his 8 string Hagstrom bass and new wah-wah pedal. "Wait until you hear this wah-wah pedal". Oh yeah, Chalpin recorded that too. They recorded him and later put it out on the market as a Jimi Hendrix recording. Check out this recorded dialogue:

Jimi: You can't, you know...like if you use it you can't put my name on the er...thing...right?

Curtis Knight: No, no, no. Hell no.

Jimi: Now, listen, huh...he can't do this, all right...ok?

Chalpin: Go ahead.

Jimi: Edward (Chalpin), can you hear me?

Chalpin: I can hear you loud enough.

Curtis Knight: You can't use his name for any of this.

Chalpin: Oh don't worry about it.

Jimi: No, but...no seriously though, seriously though..

Chalpin: It's our own tape, don't worry about it.

Jimi: Huh?

Chalpin: I won't use it. Don't worry.

Of course he would use it! Chalpin wasn't crazy, he was a businessman. Something with Jimi's name on it meant duckets in the bucket. The question is; "why did Jimi go back in the first place?" He was probably trying to smooth things over with Chalpin with the idea that he could use the tracks without his name. But what good would that have been if he couldn't use Jimi's name? He had to be unaware of the details of the suit. No, he wasn't stupid just naive.

 

 

 

 

Jungle Records - Jimi Hendrix With Curtis Knight & the Squires ...

 

 

...Curtis valued Jimi greatly; when he played live, he gave over much of the set to his prodigious new guitarist. In between Curtis numbers and 60's pop covers, showman Jimi would come forward and perform the blues (as heard on previous Jungle release 'Drivin' South'). Jimi and Curtis signed a recording contract with Ed Chalpin, who made these recordings...

 

...One such contract was offered by producer Ed Chalpin, whom Hendrix met through a Kansas-born singer/guitarist named Curtis Knight. Hendrix spent the summer of 1965 scuffling for gigs and sessions around New York and bumped into Curtis Knight at a time when he was short of a guitar. (Jimi was always losing or pawning instruments.) Knight saw Hendrix’s potential, lent him a guitar and immediately added him to his band, The Squires, who played regular dates around the bars and clubs of New York and Jersey. Curtis Knight was ambitious. A better hustler than he was singer, he figured that the new guitarist would also make an impression in the studio, so he approached Ed Chalpin who ran Studio 76, on Broadway and 51st.

Chalpin quickly spotted Hendrix’s potential and signed him up to his production company, PPX. This agreement contracted Hendrix to produce and play exclusively for PPX for 3 years, in return for one dollar. Chalpin seems to have seen this as a pretty good break for the young Jimmy Hendrix …

Ed Chalpin. In almost 40 years of my career as a producer and manager I have, at most, taken eight acts under contract. They had to be something special. One of them was Jimmy Hendrix. Jimmy was to sing play and arrange for me exclusively. The contract was signed in the Hotel America on the night of 15th October 1965. At that time it was usual to insert the clause ‘For one dollar and other good and valuable consideration’ in contracts.

Tracks 1-10 of this album come from two studio sessions in late 1965, recorded soon after Jimmy signed to Chalpin. They’re mostly originals, written by Curtis Knight or other players on the sessions -- though some originals are more ‘original’ than others, as you’ll see when you play the ‘protest’ song, How Would You Feel. Hendrix’s guitar line shows that he was familiar with Mike Bloomfield’s work on Like A Rolling Stone...

 

 

 

 

Jimi Hendrix - 3 Deleted Albums notes by John Perry

 

 

...John Perry’s notes to three deleted Jimi Hendrix albums

Just in case you’ve missed out on these albums.

The albums are now DELETED, because the Jimi Hendrix Estate’s solicitors provided us with evidence of a 1973 High Court Judgement, which deemed that most of these original 1965, 1966 & 1967 recordings made by PPX Enterprises should be - destroyed!

***If you're interested in the background of Curtis Knight and insight into his and Jimi Hendrix's relationship with entrepreneur Ed Chalpin (the man who first signed Jimi), there's a new book out by Kathy Knight-McConnell.  Not only was she Curtis's partner for 16 years, she also worked for Ed Chalpin for long periods, and saw plenty of the legal machinations.  'Curtis Knight - Living in the Shadow of Jimi Hendrix' is best bought directly from Kathy's ebay shop.***...

 

...Hendrix was the star turn with Curtis Knight’s band The Squires, a solid R&B outfit who worked the New York/New Jersey club circuit. On Boxing Day 1965 they played one of their regular venues, Georges Club 20 in Hackensack, New Jersey, with producer Ed Chalpin’s tape machine rolling. This is no chance audience-recording: it’s clear from Knight’s patter between songs that the band know they’re being recorded and Jimi plays - and sings - with all the intensity he can muster. And he’s having lotsa fun...

 

...One such contract was offered by producer Ed Chalpin, whom Hendrix met through a Kansas-born singer/guitarist named Curtis Knight. Hendrix spent the summer of 1965 scuffling for gigs and sessions around New York and bumped into Curtis Knight at a time when he was short of a guitar. (Jimi was always losing or pawning instruments.) Knight saw Hendrix’s potential, lent him a guitar and immediately added him to his band, The Squires, who played regular dates around the bars and clubs of New York and Jersey. Curtis Knight was ambitious. A better hustler than he was singer, he figured that the new guitarist would also make an impression in the studio, so he approached Ed Chalpin who ran Studio 76, on Broadway and 51st.

Chalpin quickly spotted Hendrix’s potential and signed him up to his production company, PPX. This agreement contracted Hendrix to produce and play exclusively for PPX for 3 years, in return for one dollar. Chalpin seems to have seen this as a pretty good break for the young Jimmy Hendrix …   

Ed Chalpin. In almost 40 years of my career as a producer and manager I have, at most, taken eight acts under contract. They had to be something special. One of them was Jimmy Hendrix. Jimmy was to sing play and arrange for me exclusively. The contract was signed in the Hotel America on the night of 15th October 1965. At that time it was usual to insert the clause ‘For one dollar and other good and valuable consideration’ in contracts.

Tracks 1-10 of this album come from two studio sessions in late 1965, recorded soon after Jimmy signed to Chalpin. They’re mostly originals, written by Curtis Knight or other players on the sessions -- though some originals are more ‘original’ than others, as you’ll see when you play the ‘protest’ song, How Would You Feel. Hendrix’s guitar line shows that he was familiar with Mike Bloomfield’s work on Like A Rolling Stone...

 

...Away from the Experience, Hendrix went into Ed Chalpin's Studio 76 with his old partner, Curtis Knight. From these sessions came the tracks on this album, The Summer of Love Sessions. (Curtis Knight and Hendrix can be heard together on the CD's Driving South and Knock Yourself Out FREUD CD 065 and FREUD CD 066 – rarities now, as they're out of print.)...

 

 

 

Ed Chalpin Papers (ARC.0072) - Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and ...

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - OCTOBER 24th, 2006

 

RE: JIMI HENDRIX AUCTION OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL FRANK JEFFERY BY OCEAN TOMO AUCTIONS LLC    

 

Elvier von Lear of DragonSlayer Films LLC and Lawrence Miller of Purple Haze Records Ltd explained to Raymond Millien of Ocean Tomo why the Michael Frank Jeffery Estate does not own the rights of Jimi Hendrix, as claimed by Ed Chalpin, the Administrator of the Estate. 

 

Raymond Millien of Ocean Tomo said: “Assuming you are right, only a fool would buy it.” 

 

History Detail Ed Chalpin Administrator of the Michael Frank Jeffery Estate since 6 September 2000 when he became the administrator of the estate. 

 

5 March 1973 

Michael Jeffery died  

 

15 March 1973 

Administration of the Estate was granted to his wife Gillian Rosemary Jeffery. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the estate as worth NIL 

 

6 November 1974 

Administration of the Estate granted to Frank Albert Edward Jeffery. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the estate as worth 2000 (UK Pounds).

 

6 September 2000 

Administration of the Estate granted to Ed Chalpin. A sworn affidavit to the Inland Revenue in the UK shows the gross value of the Estate as worth NiL.  Purple Haze Records Ltd   (Co reg. 4320394)

 

24 November 2000 

Harbottle & Lewis, the UK Lawyers acting for Ed Chalpin/ PPX Enterprises and the Michael Jeffery Estate wrote to another UK Law Firm Russells Solicitors on behalf of the Michael Jeffery Estate. This was after Ed Chalpin became the Administrator of the Estate that showed a gross value of NIL and wrote: ‘In the course of proceedings for issue against your client we have discovered gaps in Michael Jeffery’s chain of title that on the information at present available indicates that he did not own the copyrights in the Hendrix recordings’. ‘In particular there is no evidence of rights being assigned from YAMETA (the company which as producer, became the first owner of the copyright in many of the recordings and granted licenses to exploit many of the recordings) to Chas Chandler and Mike Jeffery.’ 

 

5 November 2001 

Ed Chalpin suggested setting up a UK Company called Purple Haze Records Ltd and sent a DAT tape of ‘Axis Bold As Love,’ the sleeve detail showing the name of YAMETA and a design showing the name was produced. 

 

9 November 2001 

On the instruction of Ed Chalpin, Purple Haze Records Ltd was set up; the reason Chalpin gave was to get Experience Hendrix LLC to sue the company in the UK in order to have them disclose documents of their so-called chain of title to Jimi Hendrix recordings that he said they could not show. 

 

1 March 2002 

A letter was sent to Harbottle & Lewis the UK Lawyers acting for Ed Chalpin/ PPX Enterprises Inc and the Michael Jeffery Estate of which Chalpin was the Administrator asking them to check the graphics detail on the sleeve for the Axis Bold As Love CD where it showed among other things YAMETA. 

 

4 March 2002 

Harbottle & Lewis the UK Lawyers wrote back and advised ‘If you are to face proceedings for breach of copyright, the last thing you would want is a statement to the effect that the copyright in the recordings belong to YAMETA, which is what the symbol suggests. I would have thought your position was that the copyright belonged to Michael Jeffery.’ Chalpin’s UK Lawyer had advised Purple Haze Records Ltd to unlawfully exchange a copyright. 

 

5 July 2002 

A Judgment against Ed Chalpin / PPX Enterprises Inc in the High Court in London read: ‘Ed Chalpin / PPX Enterprises Inc must not issue or release recordings on which Jimi Hendrix performed in any capacity whatsoever (other than 33 songs with Jimi Hendrix as a sideman). The proceedings initially began on the 14 May 2001. 

 

29 July 2002 

Ed Chalpin the Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate since the 6 September 2000 sent a fax that read: ‘I never had any rights to begin with’ and ‘I really believe the company paying $40,000 will require representation of ownership of the masters, which as you know, I don’t have and wont give’ This was in answer from a US Distributor who was interested in licensing the Rainbow Bridge Concert CD from the Michael Jeffery Estate. 

 

7 and 14 November 2002

After losing the above Judgment Ed Chalpin Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate issued a license to Purple Haze Records Ltd for the Axis Bold As Love album and the Rainbow Bridge Concert album.  

 

Please note: Ed Chalpin became the Administrator of the Michael Jeffery Estate on the 6 September 2000. If the Michael Jeffery Estate did own the rights Chalpin now claims, why did he lose the High Court action? All he need have done is show the court evidence the Michael Jeffery Estate did own the rights he claimed.  

 

20 January 2005

In the Supreme Court in New York in the case between Maxwell T Cohen the previous Administrator of the Estate of Michael Jeffery and Warner Bros where Warner Bros seeks to have the attorney’s fees and costs awarded against the Estate of Michael Jeffery and the successor ancillary Administrator Edward Chalpin. The court ordered the Michael Jeffery Estate and Ed Chalpin to pay $143,321-38, which the Judge ordered. 

 

Despite having gained control of the Michael Jeffery Estate from which 14 UK Charities should benefit and despite Ed Chalpin asking two of the Charities in London if they could use their Charities to influence the Judge in his lost action in London, Chalpin still has no evidence to support his claim. 

 

Dragonslayer Films LLC and Purple Haze Records LTD believe that Ed Chalpin/The Michael Jeffery or Frank Jeffery Estate do not own the rights they are claiming and are attempting to pass off in the Ocean Tomo auction. If they indeed owned the rights they claim Chalpin wouldn’t have lost his UK court action and would in fact have been able to grant the license requested in the United States. 

 

 

 

 

...Ed Chalpin Papers (ARC.0072)

General Information

Title:Ed Chalpin Papers

Extent:0.21 Linear feet

(1 half Hollinger box)

Dates:Inclusive, 1965-1991; Bulk, 1965-1969Language of Materials:Materials are in English

Preferred Citation:[Identification of Item], Ed Chalpin Papers, Library and Archives, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

Custodial History:The Ed Chalpin Papers were received by The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, Inc. as a gift from Ed Chalpin on March 1, 2001. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, Inc. transferred the collection to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. on March 31, 2011...

 

...The Ed Chalpin Papers span the years 1965 to 1991, with the bulk of the materials dating between 1965 and 1980. The collection consists of business records, clippings, correspondence, and photographs. Also included in the Papers is material related to the dispute between Chalpin and various parties, from October 1965 through October 1968, over Jimi Hendrix's "exclusive artist productions writing contract." Of particular note are several photographs of Hendrix during his time with The Squires. Chalpin’ papers provide documentation of the nature of early artist-producer relationships and a behind-the-scenes look at being a producer in the rock music industry.

Biographical Note

Ed Chalpin was an entrepreneur and record producer. On October 15, 1965, Chalpin signed a three-year recording contract with Jimi Hendrix and his New York based R&B band, Curtis Knight and the Squires. The contract gave Hendrix only 1% of any royalties that his recordings earned and the sum of "one dollar." After leaving Chalpin and Knight, Hendrix went on to achieve fame, but many years of legal battles ensued regarding that first contract with Chalpin.

Sources

Evans, Rush. "Jimi Hendrix at the Dawn of a New Decade." Goldmine. Accessed April 4, 2011. http://www.goldminemag.com/tag/ed-chalpin...

 

 

 

Ed Chalpin vs Michael Jeffery Estate - Forum Jimi Hendrix - Aceboard

 

...Radioactive Records had previously issued fourteen unauthorized Jimi Hendrix titles, many drawn from poor quality audio sources such as amateur, monophonic audience recordings. Radioactive claimed rights to manufacture and distribute this material under a license purportedly granted by longtime Jimi Hendrix litigant Ed Chalpin, presently acting under the guise of the Michael Jeffery estate, which he arranged to revive several years ago. Jeffery, who served as Hendrix's manager, died in 1973. Jeffery has no claim to any portion of the Jimi Hendrix estate or the rights owned and exploited by Experience Hendrix. 

 

Mr. Chalpin instigated a lawsuit in the United States in 2001 asserting the same claims (in the name of the elderly former ancillary administrator of the Michael Jeffery estate in New York, now deceased). The New York court rejected that claim as a "meritless" fabrication. 

Experience Hendrix also obtained a legal injunction against Mr. Chalpin (and his company PPX Enterprises Inc.) in July 2002 that restricts Mr. Chalpin and PPX from issuing, releasing or licensing the exploitation of any Jimi Hendrix recordings, other than 33 Curtis Knight & The Squires masters largely recorded in 1965 when Hendrix was an unknown sideman before he gained international fame in 1967 fronting the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Mr. Chalpin has since defaulted on payment of a significant costs order that was awarded to Experience Hendrix in that litigation...

 

 

 

 

The 1966 Batman Message Board - Sam Chalpin's Batman Theme.

...I just happened upon this website.  For what it's worth, Sam Chalpin is my grandfather, and Ed Chalpin is my uncle.  While all this stuff happened a few years before I was born, based on my own experiences, my uncle is not the bastard that the article makes him out to be.  Though my grandfather died in 1969, I just don't believe that my uncle treated him that way, because if he was that kind of a human being, it would have shown throughout my life.  Who could like a guy like that?  Besides, on occasion, my uncle would talk about my grandfather, and he just didn't come off as someone who could treat him that poorly.  I expect there was a hell of a lot of editorializing in that article.  

As for the album itself, it was recorded as a comedy.  A gag.  My grandfather believe it or not WAS a good singer.  He used to be a cantor for his temple.  That album was basically clowning around.  

What completely sucked was that I missed that week or month the whole album was posted on the internet.  I have one copy of the vinyl, but it's 2007, so that does very little good...

...Thanks.  Obviously, with my uncle in the music business, people have been badmouthing him for years.  One of his biggest claims to fame was being one of the first people to sign Hendrix to a professional contract.  This actually happened before Hendrix became famous, but once that happened, my uncle was sitting on a hell of a contract.  When that happens, the big guy tries to take advantage of the little guy, but my uncle doesn't take any crap, so there are lawsuits abound.  Lawsuits make people unhappy, especially when you win far more often than you lose.  So in a nutshell, there are a lot of people that don't like my uncle.Like I said, I seriously can't imagine my uncle being THAT much of a dick to his father.  If he gave him a hard time, it was probably like most adult children give their parents a hard time.  I doubt anyone doesn't fight with their parents no matter what the age.  Doesn't mean you don't have a good relationship.My guess is that the guy who wrote that article just didn't like my uncle very much and exaggerated what happened.  Bottom line is when could that article have been written?  A couple of year ago?  That recording session was in the 1960s.  Not exactly fresh in anyone's mind.

Oh, and I'm a huge 1960s Batman fan.

If only they can get that show out on DVD...

Hi, I just registered because I came across this thread about Ed Chalpin and thought I would add my .02.

I recently met him when he was interviewing me for a job and we talked at length for a bit over one hour.

While no one here knows me, so it is hard for anyone here to get a good feeling for my personality, I will go ahead and say that one of the few gifts I have actively cultivated throughout my life is that I'm a damn good judge of character. So good that I generally make people who are used to fluff-conversations and living in their made-up ego-lands extremely uncomfortable and they generally say things like "...stop staring into my soul like that.."

That being said, I have to say a few things about Ed.

1) I see why he is unpopular. He's a strong man and doesn't apologize for anything. He's straight to the point and he is transparent about his goals to do well and honest about his distaste for certain things, without a hesitation.

2) He absolutely did not seem like a BS artist of any kind. Now, that may seem like a vapid comment at first, but for the Music Industry, that actually means a lot! A hell of a lot to me actually! EVERYONE drops names and blah blahs and tries to get you to really think they are just so bloody "cool" and "successful" and special and whatever is cool. It is a unique event to meet anyone NOT full of stuff in this industry. And that's not because they're bad people! It's because it's a feeling-based medium and you're selling feelings and dealing with egos. You learn to play games to survive. Ed seems to somehow have never done any of that or even cared to learn such things. 

Strong people are always being ripped off, ripped down and bastardized. Unless someone can make a buck off of you, they generally try to put u below them. Nowhere more so than in music (in my experience anyway, having done several fields both in technical things and in artistic fields.)

I don't claim to know the guy's personal life at all, but seeing how he treated his Administrative Assistant, how he spoke to me, who he just met and is basically a 'nobody' to most people in his position, how he spoke on the phone to the lawyers and licensing agents who called during the interview (when he took the calls, which was few) I have an extremely hard time believing all the negative things that are being spread and that I read before meeting him. (even before meeting him I had a predispostion to NOT liking him because of all that is being spread about him.)

He's a straight up guy and if he had any inkling of malice or arrogance in him I think it would have shown clear as day.

I challenge and request that people keep an open mind about him. I'm not taking the job he's offering because I'm actually happy where I'm at, so this doesn't really gain me anything to sign up here to say my piece, actually it is taking the time that I need to get a lot of work done and I'd much rather be working on things as I have a lot of catching up to do on some work-related stuff. I just feel like someone who isn't related to him, just met him and generally dislikes most people I meet in the music industry could give another perspective. I hope it is at least somewhat received, although people generally don't like to be told they're wrong.

Also, I watched the 1966 batman all the time growing up, so the batman kid part of me is really happy to post here.  

There's a student (undergraduate) at the college I graduated from who goes to class in a batman cape. That maybe should be a different post, but I figured ths should at least contain SOMEthing batman-related and interesting or else that's just disrespectful to the rest of the community here. 

I hope this post isn't flame bait. I have no intention of continuing an argument or anything nor trolling boards...